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Mouth Ulcer

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Bad breath plagues just about everyone at one time or another.  People snicker about it, but bad breath can be a devastating social disability.

Causes:

  • The mouth:  The structures in the mouth that can harbor bad breath are: The teeth, The Gums, The tongue (especially the back of the tongue).
  • The upper respiratory tract: This includes the nasal cavities, sinuses, throat, tonsils and the larynx (voice box). A) The term for bad breath from the upper respiratory tract is ozostomia. B) Ozostomia is the second most common type of bad breath, and is most commonly associated with post nasal drip, but can be associated with infections of the various organs in the upper respiratory tracts as well, including sinusitis, sore throat and laryngitis.
  • The lungs: A) Stomatodysodia is the term for bad breath caused by outright disease processes in the lungs, such as various infections, emphysema, bronchitis or lung cancer. B) Halitosis is the term for bad breath that results from physiologic processes elsewhere in the body and carried to the lungs by the bloodstream, or to the mouth by chronic vomiting.
  • The stomach: Technically, this type of bad breath is a subcategory of halitosis, but one that does not originate from the lungs.  Bad breath originating from the stomach is caused by disease processes which produce chronic vomiting.

Symptoms:

  • Poor dental hygiene —  Teeth are coated with film or plaque, food debris trapped between teeth, pale or swollen gums
  • Infections in the mouth —  Gums may be red, swollen and bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing; pus may drain from between teeth; a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth; loose teeth or a change in “fit” of a denture; painful, open sores on the tongue or gums
  • Respiratory tract infections —  Sore throat, swollen lymph nodes (“swollen glands”) in the neck, fever, stuffy nose, a greenish or yellowish nasal discharge, a mucus-producing cough
  • External agents —  Cigarette stains on fingers and teeth, a uniform yellow “coffee stain” on teeth
  • Dry mouth —  Difficulty swallowing dry foods, difficulty speaking for a prolonged period because of mouth dryness, a burning sensation in the mouth, an unusually high number of dental caries, dry eyes (in Sjögren’s syndrome)
  • Systemic (bodywide) illnesses —  Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

Diagnosis:

  • Self Diagnosis
  • Professional diagnosis: -  Hallimeter, -  Gas chromatography, -  BANA test, -  β-galactosidase

Ingredients:

  1. Greater galangal leaves.

Natural Remedies:

  • Alpinia galanga rhizome contains the flavonol galangin

Take some greater galangal leaves, clean it and chew it.

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Stomatitis, a non-specific term for an inflamed and sore mouth, can disrupt a person’s ability to eat, talk, or sleep. Stomatitis can occur anywhere within the mouth, including the inside of the cheeks, gums, tongue, lips, and palate.

Types of Stomatitis

The following are some common examples of stomatitis:

  • Canker sore or aphthous ulcer.
  • Cold sores , also known as “fever blisters”

Causes:

Canker sore:

Many factors may contribute to their development, such as

  • Certain medications, trauma to the mouth, poor nutrition, stress, bacteria or viruses, lack of sleep, sudden weight loss, and certain foods such as potatoes, citrus fruits, coffee, chocolate, cheese, and nuts.
  • Canker sores may also be related to a temporarily reduced immune system because of a cold or flu, hormonal changes, mechanical irritation, or low levels of vitamin B12 or folate. Even biting the inside of the cheek or chewing a sharp piece of food can trigger a canker sore.
  • Canker sores may result from a genetic predisposition and are considered an autoimmune disease; they are not contagious.

Cold sores or fever blisters:

  • Fever blisters are contagious as they are caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1. The initial infection often occurs before adulthood and may be confused with a cold or the flu. Once the person is infected with the virus, it stays in the body, becoming dormant and reactivated by such conditions as stress, fever, trauma, hormonal changes (such as menstruation), and exposure to sunlight.

Symptoms:

Canker Sores:

  • Sores can be painful
  • Usually last 5 to 10 days
  • Tend to recur
  • Generally not associated with fever

Cold sores or “fever blisters”:

  • Usually painful
  • Usually gone in 7 to 10 days
  • Sometimes associated with cold or flu-like symptoms

Diagnosis:

  • Treatment of the underlying cause
  • Oral hygiene measures
  • Topical local anesthetics
  • Anesthetic mouthwash
  • Get more vitamin B12 and foods rich in iron into your diet.

Ingredients:

  1. Solanum nigrum leaves.
  2. Mango seed kernels.

Natural Remedies:

  • (Solanum nigrum) Black nightshade consist of moisture 82.1%, protein 5.9%, fat 1.0%, minerals 2.1% and carbohydrates 8.9% per 100 grams. The minerals and vitamins presents in it include calcium, iron, phosphorus, riboflavin, niacin and vitamin C.
  • Mango Seed kernels: After soaking and drying to 10% moisture content, the kernels are fed to poultry and cattle. Without the removal of tannins, the feeding value is low. Cuban scientists declare that the mineral levels are so low mineral supplementation is needed if the kernel is used for poultry feed, for which purpose it is recommended mainly because it has little crude fiber.

Take a juice of solanum nigrum leaves. Grind the one mango seed kernels with this juice. Then eat it.

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Bad breath plagues just about everyone at one time or another.  People snicker about it, but bad breath can be a devastating social disability.

Causes:

  • The mouth: The structures in the mouth that can harbor bad breath are:

The teeth, The Gums, The tongue (especially the back of the tongue)

  • The upper respiratory tract: This includes the nasal cavities, sinuses, throat, tonsils and the larynx (voice box).

A. The term for bad breath from the upper respiratory tract is ozostomia

B. Ozostomia is the second most common type of bad breath, and is most commonly associated with post nasal drip, but can be associated with infections of the various organs in the upper respiratory tracts as well, including sinusitis, sore throat and laryngitis.

  • The lungs:

A. Stomatodysodia is the term for bad breath caused by outright disease processes in the lungs, such as various infections, emphysema, bronchitis or lung cancer.

B. Halitosis is the term for bad breath that results from physiologic processes elsewhere in the body and carried to the lungs by the bloodstream, or to the mouth by chronic vomiting.

  • The stomach: Technically, this type of bad breath is a subcategory of halitosis, but one that does not originate from the lungs.  Bad breath originating from the stomach is caused by disease processes which produce chronic vomiting.

Symptoms:

  • Poor dental hygiene —  Teeth are coated with film or plaque, food debris trapped between teeth, pale or swollen gums
  • Infections in the mouth —  Gums may be red, swollen and bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing; pus may drain from between teeth; a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth; loose teeth or a change in “fit” of a denture; painful, open sores on the tongue or gums
  • Respiratory tract infections —  Sore throat, swollen lymph nodes (“swollen glands”) in the neck, fever, stuffy nose, a greenish or yellowish nasal discharge, a mucus-producing cough
  • External agents —  Cigarette stains on fingers and teeth, a uniform yellow “coffee stain” on teeth
  • Dry mouth —  Difficulty swallowing dry foods, difficulty speaking for a prolonged period because of mouth dryness, a burning sensation in the mouth, an unusually high number of dental caries, dry eyes (in Sjögren’s syndrome)
  • Systemic (bodywide) illnesses —  Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

Diagnosis:

  • Self Diagnosis
  • Professional diagnosis-  Hallimeter

-  Gas chromatography

-  BANA test

-  β-galactosidase

Ingredients:

  1. Nutmeg leaves.

Natural Remedies:

  • Nutmeg: Medicinal Properties: Sedative, stimulant, relaxant, anti inflammatory, antiseptic, bactericide, etc. Culinary Uses: Nutmeg is used in sweet and spicy dishes like pies, custard, cookies spice cakes, cheese sauces, soups, egg and vegetables dishes. Mace is often preferred in light-colored dishes for the bright orange, saffron-like color it imparts.

Take some leaves of nutmeg, clean and crush it. Soak it in water. By using this water, flush out your mouth.

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A bitter taste in the mouth that is not from a bitter substance is a distorted sense of taste. A persistent bad taste in the mouth, whether bitter, metallic or foul, is called dysgeusia.

Causes:

A bitter or altered sense of taste can be due to certain diseases, disorders. Common conditions and everyday habits that can cause a bitter taste in your mouth include:

  • Breathing through your mouth
  • Dehydration
  • Dry mouth
  • Smoking
  • Bilious
  • Pregnancy

Symptoms:

  • Bitter taste
  • Poor sense of taste
  • Vomiting

Ingredients:

  1. Spondias mombin leaf.

Natural Remedies:

  • Spondias pinnata bark contains large amounts of flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits high antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities. It also chelates iron and has reducing power.

Eat spondias leaves in raw or take with your food like chutney .

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Bad breath plagues just about everyone at one time or another.  People snicker about it, but bad breath can be a devastating social disability.

Causes:

  • The mouth: The structures in the mouth that can harbor bad breath are:

* The teeth, The Gums, The tongue (especially the back of the tongue)

  • The upper respiratory tract: This includes the nasal cavities, sinuses, throat, tonsils and the larynx (voice box).

A. The term for bad breath from the upper respiratory tract is ozostomia

B. Ozostomia is the second most common type of bad breath, and is most commonly associated with post nasal drip, but can be associated with infections of the various organs in the upper respiratory tracts as well, including sinusitis, sore throat and laryngitis.

  • The lungs:

A. Stomatodysodia is the term for bad breath caused by outright disease processes in the lungs, such as various infections, emphysema, bronchitis or lung cancer.

B. Halitosis is the term for bad breath that results from physiologic processes elsewhere in the body and carried to the lungs by the bloodstream, or to the mouth by chronic vomiting.

  • The stomach: Technically, this type of bad breath is a subcategory of halitosis, but one that does not originate from the lungs.  Bad breath originating from the stomach is caused by disease processes which produce chronic vomiting.

Symptoms:

  • Poor dental hygiene —  Teeth are coated with film or plaque, food debris trapped between teeth, pale or swollen gums
  • Infections in the mouth —  Gums may be red, swollen and bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing; pus may drain from between teeth; a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth; loose teeth or a change in “fit” of a denture; painful, open sores on the tongue or gums
  • Respiratory tract infections —  Sore throat, swollen lymph nodes (“swollen glands”) in the neck, fever, stuffy nose, a greenish or yellowish nasal discharge, a mucus-producing cough
  • External agents —  Cigarette stains on fingers and teeth, a uniform yellow “coffee stain” on teeth
  • Dry mouth —  Difficulty swallowing dry foods, difficulty speaking for a prolonged period because of mouth dryness, a burning sensation in the mouth, an unusually high number of dental caries, dry eyes (in Sjögren’s syndrome)
  • Systemic (bodywide) illnesses —  Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

Diagnosis:

  • Self Diagnosis
  • Professional diagnosis-  Hallimeter

- Gas chromatography
- BANA test
- β-galactosidase

Ingredients:

  1. Peppermint leaves.
  2. Ginger.

Natural Remedies:

  • Peppermint Leaf can help relax the bile ducts for improved flow of this very important digestive fluid. Peppermint Leaf contains bio-flavonoids and exhibits antioxidant activity. The herb can also stimulate a sluggish liver or gallbladder into performing its functions in a more effective manner. It also helps to combat indigestion.
  • Ginger: High in potassium, manganese which builds resistance to disease, protects lining of heart, blood vessels and urinary passages, silicon which promotes healthy skin, hair, teeth and nails, helps assimilate calcium and also contains Vit. A, C, E, B-complex, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, iron, zinc, calcium, beta-carotene

Take some peppermint leaves and 1 pieces of ginger, clean it then eat in raw.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Bad breath plagues just about everyone at one time or another.  People snicker about it, but bad breath can be a devastating social disability.

Causes:

  • The mouth: The structures in the mouth that can harbor bad breath are:

- The teeth, The Gums, The tongue (especially the back of the tongue)

  • The upper respiratory tract: This includes the nasal cavities, sinuses, throat, tonsils and the larynx (voice box).

A. The term for bad breath from the upper respiratory tract is ozostomia

B. Ozostomia is the second most common type of bad breath, and is most commonly associated with post nasal drip, but can be associated with infections of the various organs in the upper respiratory tracts as well, including sinusitis, sore throat and laryngitis.

  • The lungs:

A. Stomatodysodia is the term for bad breath caused by outright disease processes in the lungs, such as various infections, emphysema, bronchitis or lung cancer.

B. Halitosis is the term for bad breath that results from physiologic processes elsewhere in the body and carried to the lungs by the bloodstream, or to the mouth by chronic vomiting.

  • The stomach: Technically, this type of bad breath is a subcategory of halitosis, but one that does not originate from the lungs.  Bad breath originating from the stomach is caused by disease processes which produce chronic vomiting.

Symptoms:

  • Poor dental hygiene —  Teeth are coated with film or plaque, food debris trapped between teeth, pale or swollen gums
  • Infections in the mouth —  Gums may be red, swollen and bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing; pus may drain from between teeth; a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth; loose teeth or a change in “fit” of a denture; painful, open sores on the tongue or gums
  • Respiratory tract infections —  Sore throat, swollen lymph nodes (“swollen glands”) in the neck, fever, stuffy nose, a greenish or yellowish nasal discharge, a mucus-producing cough
  • External agents —  Cigarette stains on fingers and teeth, a uniform yellow “coffee stain” on teeth
  • Dry mouth —  Difficulty swallowing dry foods, difficulty speaking for a prolonged period because of mouth dryness, a burning sensation in the mouth, an unusually high number of dental caries, dry eyes (in Sjögren’s syndrome)
  • Systemic (bodywide) illnesses —  Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

Diagnosis:

  • Self Diagnosis
  • Professional diagnosis-  Hallimeter

-  Gas chromatography

-  BANA test

-  β-galactosidase

Ingredients:

  1. Clove leaves.

Natural Remedies:

  • Health Benefits of Clove Leaf Clove leaves contain high amounts of eugenol, which makes it a potent anti fungal medicine. Dentists use the analgesic effect of clove leaves as an effective anesthetic in times of severe toothache. Cloves are very good sources of flavonoids and hence inhibit free radical oxidation. Clove leaves have anti-inflammatory properties. Clove leaves can also be used to treat mild infections like common cold, cough, flu, and indigestion. They are effective against bloating and flatulence too. Skin eruptions like boils, pimples and acne can find relief with topical application of clove leaves.

Take some clove leaf, clean it and eat without cooking.

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